Press

 

DKFM New Tracks Weekend, April 21-23

While we’re dancing the night away at Seagaze Festival 2017 in Seattle, we’re also spinning the freshness. We’re deep into the new offerings from Fotoform (formerly C’est La Mort, and playing Seagaze!), DIV I DED and Northeastern Railroads. Plus, we’re pushing fresh material from Bugjar, Flowerbomb, LLOLLYANNA, Static Daydream, The Infinite Seas, and The Investment. We have more new music than space to tell you about it. All the while, we’ll update you on Seagaze Festival events via Facespace and Tweeter. We’re not afraid of double duty.

That’s not to overlook last weekend’s new sparkles, including The Foreign Resort, Wozniak, Venn, Abusive Language, Retrieval, Desperate Journalist, Taffy, You’ll Never Get to Heaven, Dead Leaf Echo, The Daysleepers and SO much more.

New Tracks Weekend kicks off 8 pm Eastern, 5 pm Pacific, and continuing through Sunday at midnight Eastern, 9 Pacific. It’s the first weekend we’ll spin some of these tracks, and may be the last weekend for some others. Remember, you can listen listen via the station page at DKFM,  on Shoutcast, and on TuneIn Radio for iPhone/Android/Windows. Plus we have our branded apps for Apple’s iOSAndroid and Blackberry. Or load up the “Internet Radio” tab of your iTunes desktop client, and you’ll find DKFM Shoegaze Radio under ‘Alternative’. You can even keep up with the new tracks and artists you may have missed: we’re live-scrobbling via our last.fm profile, and live-tweeting every track on our sub-Twitter DKFMTracks account. Now you’ll know what you heard, or catch up on what you missed. Keep up with our new Facebook group for real-time discussions of what you’ve heard, and sound off!

New Tracks Weekend, April 21-23

 

 

 

 

KEXP Suggests: The 2017 Seagaze Festival at LoFi Performance Gallery 4/20-4/23

Only in its second year, the 2017 Seagaze Festival continues to lift their heads to spotlight some of the Northwest’s finest shoegaze, post punk, and psychrock bands this Thursday, April 20th through Sunday, April 23rd at the LoFi Performance Gallery.

Blackpool Astronomy guitarist Jeff McCollough has planned an impressive four-day schedule featuring beloved artist/producer Erik Blood, who recently left us for the sunny skies of Los Angeles. It’ll be a perfect “welcome home” to showcase him amongst fellow Northwest noisemakers Kingdom of the Holy Sun, This Blinding Light, and Black Nite Crash, just to name a few. Other artists making the trek from out-of-town include Chicago’s Plastic Crimewave Syndicate, LSD and the Search for God from San Francisco, and Portland bands Coloring Electric Like, The Prids, Vibrissae, and more.

In honor of this weekend’s festival, on Thursday, April 20th from 6:00 AM to 10:00 AM, The Morning Show on KEXP will play nothing but the finest shoegaze, from pioneers like My Bloody Valentine, Lush, and Ride, to newcomers like Soviet Soviet, Trementina, Blonde Redhead, and Dead Leaf Echo. We’ll also play excerpts from an exclusive interview with Rachel Goswell, founding member, vocalist, and guitarist for Slowdive. (Hear more of the interview on Thursday, May 4th, the day before the band’s first new album in over 20 years is in stores, a self-titled LP on Dead Oceans Records.) Check out a Video Roundup below of some of KEXP’s favorite shoegaze bands to get ready for the sonic takeover in Seattle this weekend.

Shoegaze morning show post

 

 

 

NORDSTROM’S – THE THREAD

At Practice with Our Shoe Designer’s “Pointy Shoegaze” Band, Fotoform

As Nordstrom’s footwear design director, Kim House oversees the styles that brands like Halogen®, Caslon®, Treasure & Bond and BP. put forward for feet. In her off-time, Kim is a singer and bassist in the band Fotoform, which she describes cheekily as a “pointy shoegaze” outfit.

“Shoegaze came out of Britain in the late ’80s, early ’90s,” Kim explains, when we meet up in the band’s practice space in Seattle’s SoDo neighborhood. “Bands like Lush, Slowdive, My Bloody Valentine were characterized by a wall of guitars, lots of effects, with ethereal vocals on top.” It’s Kim’s heavenly voice that floats like soft gauze on top of twin guitars, bass and drums. “‘Pointy shoegaze’ was a nod to some of the early ’80s dark stuff we were inspired by—and that time and that scene. People wore a lot of pointy shoes at that time.” But it’s also a nod to Kim’s day job, one that thankfully provides an outlet for her visual inspirations, like the Fotoform avant-garde photography movement, from which the band takes its name.

Fotoform is also a family. Kim looks to her bandmates, with affection and admiration, for inspiration. “We have two guitar players. Geoff  [Cox], my husband, he plays with the most amount of pedals. He has a PhD in German lit and works at a little translation agency. Our other guitarist, Stephen [Jones], is amazing. He works for Paul Allen at the Living Computer Museum, so he restores super computers,” Kim says. “Our drummer, Garret [Croxon], is super talented. He’s played with bands like the Fleet Foxes and Erik Blood. We’re super lucky to have him.”

That tight-knit feeling extends to the Seattle music scene, with which Fotoform is intimately involved. “Seattle has such an amazing music community. There are a lot of diverse artists who celebrate and support each other. It’s more of a community than a scene,” shares Kim. “The Northwest in general has a lot of great music. Tender Age from Portland is a new up-and-coming band. Erik Blood from Seattle is one of our favorites.” Kim gestures to Blood’s latest album, Lost in Slow Motion, resting near her. “Black Nite Crash, Jupe Jupe, blicky, I could go on and on.”

In her formative years, Kim was influenced by the band Blondie; she describes Debbie Harry as “my first girl idol and crush.” The Cure, Cocteau Twins, Lush and other moody ’80s acts shaped her style and sound. “Musical influences tend to shift and evolve, just like fashion,” Kim says.  Some of the musicians she’s currently got on play are Be Forest, Wild Nothing and Drab Majesty. And as for her style, Kim really does rock a pointy shoe box. “They’re easier to dance in while I play,” she explains.

Fotoform’s debut album releases on clear vinyl April 28. The band will be performing with Erik Blood at the Seagaze Festival on April 22.

NORDSTROM THREAD ARTICLE

 

 

THE STRANGER  

Seagaze Festival

Recommended by Dave Segal

Shoegaze rock is accruing momentum akin to that of the jam-band circuit, with festivals dedicated to the gauzy, dreamy subgenre, reunion tours by the original key players, and growing acceptance from major media outlets. For the second year, Seagaze Festival showcases this oft-transcendent music with 19 acts over four nights. Thursday be sure to check out the Malady of Sevendials, a family of teenage brooders evoking the hushed splendors of Cocteau Twins and A.R. Kane. Friday is stacked with reliable psych-leaning vets like Kingdom of the Holy Sun, This Blinding Light, Black Nite Crash, and the kosmische solo-guitar sojourns of God & Vanilla. Saturday, producer extraordinaire/Stranger Genius Erik Blood flies in from LA to school everyone on lush textures and luscious melodies, while the songs of fest organizer Jeff McCollough’s band, Blackpool Astronomy, whiplash you like prime-time Swervedriver. Sunday, scope Portland’s Coloring Electric Like, who rampage beautifully, like a Northwestern My Bloody Valentine. These are but a small sampling of artists who strive to swirl your brain cells into a purple haze of bliss. DAVE SEGAL

Seagaze Festival 2017 takes over Lo-Fi with four whole days of experimental free-wave weirdos blasting out post-punk, shoegaze, and psych rock. You can buy tickets for each individual day at the door, or go for the whole weekend.

April 20: Shadowhouse, Charlatan, Vibragun, The Malady of Sevendials

April 21: Kingdom of the Holy Sun, This Blinding Light, Black Nite Crash, The Black Ferns, God and Vanilla

April 22: Erik Blood, The Prids, Fotoform, Visiting Diplomats, Vibrissae, Blackpool Astronomy

April 23: Coloring Electric Like, WL WL (Well Well), Somesurprises, Dark Swoon

THE STRANGER – SEAGAZE FESTIVAL

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